Gardening Guides

How to graft a bud


How to graft to bud it is quite simple to explain (at the bottom of this article you will find the link to a practical photographic guide on the gem grafting), but the simplicity of the operation should not be misleading and before moving on to practice a couple of things it is good to know them.

In fact, if it is true that thebud grafting it has a very high probability of success and is easier to practice than graft grafting, it is equally true that everything must be done correctly to have good results.

Graft to bud in practice it means taking a bud from a twig together with a small portion of the underlying wood and inserting it into the rootstock (the plant to be grafted) after making a small T-shaped incision on the bark.

This kind of grafting, which is also called eye grafting or shield grafting, particularly suitable for young plants, which is why it is the most useful to the non-professional who has a small garden, perhaps recent, and can be done throughout the entire period of vegetation, March- May or July-September.

How to graft a gem: the removal of gems. This is the most delicate phase and must be done with a short-bladed and very handy knife (better the classic grafting tool) after having identified the gem to be taken. The bud can be 'vegetative' if taken in spring (it will sprout immediately) or dormant if taken in late summer (it will sprout the following year).

The knife should be positioned on the cutting side just before the gem in an oblique direction. Having placed the thumb of the hand holding the knife on this side of the gem, you begin to engrave by passing the blade under the gem and stopping the cut about 1 cm after the gem.

At this point the blade is removed and the flap still attached to the branch is cut perpendicularly. The portion taken will have the shape of a small shield with the gem in the center. If the twig carrying the bud is loaded with leaves, these must be detached but leaving a part of the petiole.

How to graft a bud: inserting gems. The suitable point for grafting should be sought smooth, without spurs and in the collar area usually 20 cm from the foot (especially when it comes to young plants).

With the knife or the graft, a T or inverted T incision is made on the rootstock, trying not to carve the young wood under the bark. Then the dull side is used to lift the bark and get stuck under the gem, taking care to maintain the right orientation of the gem and to match the edges of the shield with those of the incision. Finally, everything is tightly bandaged with elastic bands.

Photographic guide



Video: Easy Summer Chip Bud Grafting W. Mark Albert, Fruit Tree Graft Demonstration (January 2022).